Bread (series)

Several years ago, I came across Joseph Rykwert’s book, The Dancing Column. This sparked an exploration of the connection between the Demeter/Persephone myth and its visual trail over the centuries.

 

The phialae carried by the Erechtheion caryatids look nearly identical to the loaves of bread seen throughout the Mediterranean, and the Corinthian capital owes its form to the basket, stone and wild acanthus positioned over Persephone's grave. Such “pagan” images continue to play a prominent role in the architecture of Roman Catholic churches, even in the United States.

In Panis Angelicus, hollowed-out Corinthian capitals are
transformed into cornucopiae overflowing with breads, among which are hidden a variety of putti (baby angels), Everything is presented in the same stark whiteness, blending the tangible with the ineffable, the material with the spiritual, and the architectural with the metaphorical. It was most recently shown as part of the exhibition MYTHOS at the Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, VA. A video tour, by the curator Dr. Michele Greet, can be accessed here.

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; bread casts from loaves; installation size varies;

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; bread casts from loaves; installation size varies;

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; bread casts from loaves; installation size varies; shown here in 2020

Panis Angelicus: detail

Panis Angelicus: detail

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; bread casts from loaves; installation size varies; shown here in 2010

House of Bread: detail

House of Bread: detail

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; individual elements cast from life; installation size varies; 2009

Structure and Metaphor: detail

Structure and Metaphor: detail

Hydrostone and Fiberglas/resin; individual elements cast from life; installation size varies; 2008

Cupboard

Cupboard

An installation in the pantry of a private house as part of an exhibition series in support of the Lancaster Museum of Art. Hydrostone cast from loaves of bread; installation size varies; 2010

Cupboard: detail

Cupboard: detail

2010 An installation in a private house as part of an exhibition series in support of the Lancaster Museum of Art. The kitchen pantry was filled with loaves of bread and wine bottles, all cast in white Hydrostone. The loaves and bottles extended into the dining room where viewers partook of a special dinner. Hydrostone; objects life size.

Cupboard: detail

Cupboard: detail

An installation in the pantry of a private house as part of an exhibition series in support of the Lancaster Museum of Art. Hydrostone cast from loaves of bread; installation size varies; 2010

Bread and Roses

Bread and Roses

Bread and roses — made famous by striking textile workers — is much more than a slogan. The combination is an ancient one that appears again and again in traditional art and festivals throughout the Mediterranean. Fiberglas/resin, dried bread and dried roses; 2011

Bread and Roses: detail

Bread and Roses: detail

Fiberglas/resin, dried bread and dried roses; 2011

Bread and Roses: detail

Bread and Roses: detail

Fiberglas/resin, dried bread and dried roses; 2011

Pane Trasparente

Pane Trasparente

translucent plastic and inkjet prints; casts from a Sicilian bread called "cuccidati"; photographs of women in Italian architecture; installation size varies but each element measures 5" diameter x 1.5" deep; 2009

Pane Trasparente: detail

Pane Trasparente: detail

translucent plastic and inkjet prints; casts from a Sicilian bread called "cuccidati"; photographs of women in Italian architecture; installation size varies but each element measures 5" diameter x 1.5" deep; 2009

Pane Trasparente: detail

Pane Trasparente: detail

translucent plastic and inkjet prints; casts from a Sicilian bread called "cuccidati"; photographs of women in Italian architecture; installation size varies but each element measures 5" diameter x 1.5" deep; 2009

Pane Trasparente: detail

Pane Trasparente: detail

translucent plastic and inkjet prints; casts from a Sicilian bread called "cuccidati"; photographs of women in Italian architecture; installation size varies but each element measures 5" diameter x 1.5" deep; 2009

All artwork on this site © Virginia Maksymowicz.

Most photographs are by Blaise Tobia or Virginia Maksymowicz

other photos are credited.

Some works are collaborative.

Some permissions for use and distribution

available through a Creative Commons License

Attribution - NonCommercial - NoDerivs 3.0

 

Cupboard: detail

An installation in the pantry of a private house as part of an exhibition series in support of the Lancaster Museum of Art. Hydrostone cast from loaves of bread; installation size varies; 2010